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Skoll Foundation Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skoll_Foundation

Skoll Foundation
Skoll Foundation logo.svg
Formation1999
TypePrivate foundation and Supporting organization
HeadquartersPalo Alto, CA, United States
Donald Gips
Key people
Disbursements$56,000,000
Expenses (2018)$17,329,423[2]
Endowment (2018)$1,127,000,000
Websitewww.skoll.org Edit this at Wikidata

The Skoll Foundation is a private foundation based in Palo Alto, California.[3] The foundation makes grants and investments intended to reduce global poverty. Jeffrey Skoll created the foundation in 1999.[4]

The total assets of the foundation (including its affiliated funds) are $1.127 billion as of the end of 2018.[5] The combined entities made grants totaling about $71 million in 2018 (and disbursements of $56M), based on unaudited numbers reported by the foundation.[5] According to the most recent audited financial statements,[2] the non-grant expenses for the foundation totaled around $17M in 2018.

History[edit]

Skoll set up the foundation in 1999 to fund social entrepreneurship[6] through awards, grants and educational programs at Oxford and Harvard Universities.[7]

In late 2003, Skoll established the private Skoll Foundation. The two entities, which have distinct governing bodies but share staff and offices, together operate the foundation's grantmaking and other programs.[8]

In 2001, Skoll hired Sally Osberg, formerly the founding executive director of the Children's Discovery Museum of San Jose.[9] Osberg was the foundation's first employee, president and CEO. Osberg claims that she led the organization through its startup, implementation and renewal phases. Osberg and her colleagues set up platforms to connect civil society members with private and public sector leaders. These platforms included partnerships with Sundance Festival and Oxford's Saïd Business School.[10]

In 2018, Richard Fahey assumed the role of interim president after 14 years of executive leadership at the foundation.[11]

In February 2019, Donald Gips was appointed as the foundation's CEO. Formerly, Gips served as the U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of South Africa.[1]

In March 2021, the foundation hired Marla Blow as its president and chief operating officer. She had formerly served as the senior vice president for social impact in North America for the Mastercard Center for Inclusive Growth.[12]

The foundation, which moved to its Palo Alto headquarters in 2004, also collaborated closely with the Skoll Global Threats Fund, established in 2009, to address climate change, pandemics, water security, nuclear proliferation, and conflict in the Middle East. Some of the fund's initiatives supported by the foundation have included an app, developed in partnership with the Brazilian Ministry of Health, that allowed monitoring of health conditions and potential infection by the Zika virus during the 2016 Olympics;[13] supporting surveillance technologies that identify epidemics at their earliest outbreak;[14] and development of an online tool that will help policymakers identify global water risk and food security hot spots.[15]

The foundation began funding research into pandemic preparedness and prevention in 2009. Simultaneously, the organization funded research into climate change water scarcity, nuclear weapons and conflict in the Middle East; it called this its Global Threats Fund. Previously, the foundation partnered with Google's philanthropic arm, Google.org to fund Nathan Wolfe's 2008 research into cross-species transmission amongst Cameroonian bushmeat hunters.[16] In 2018 the fund created Ending Pandemics, a non-profit spun out from its research into pandemic detection and rapid response.[17]

Skoll increased the foundation's 2020 grant to $200 million to respond to the pandemic's economic, health and social impact.[18] The African Field Epidemiology Network, a group that works with Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention were the foundation's first COVID-related grantees. The foundation also gave sixty-four past and current Skoll grantees $50,000 in emergency funding during this period.[17]

Skoll Center for Social Entrepreneurship at the University of Oxford[edit]

In 2003, the foundation donated $7.5M to the Saïd Business School at Oxford University to establish the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship. The center studies and promotes socially purposed businesses and hosts a one-year MBA programme in social entrepreneurship.[19] The grant also funded an endowed lectureship, program director, visiting fellows, five MBA student fellowships, visiting fellows, and the annual Skoll World Forum on Social Entrepreneurship.[8][20] The Skoll Centre's activities concentrate on educating social change leaders, practical research and convening leaders in the social change field. The Skoll Center's activities focus on educating social change leaders, practical research and convening leaders in the social change field.[21]

Skoll World Forum[edit]

The annual Skoll World Forum assembles social entrepreneurship leaders[22] at the Said Business School at to discuss solutions to social challenges.[23] The foundation held its first forum in 2004.[24] Attendance was roughly 1200 as of the 2019 Forum,[25] and the delegates represented around 80 countries.[26] The event facilitates impact investing.[27]

Notable speakers[edit]

The Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship[edit]

Image shows Jeffery Skoll and Desmond Tutu at the Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship
Jeffery Skoll (left) and Desmond Tutu (right) at the Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship

Each year, the Skoll Foundation presents the Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship.[33] The foundation accepts nominations from within its network.[34] The following list of Skoll Awards organized by year. Skoll claims the awards are to raise awareness through storytelling. "We felt that part of our mission was to create a ceremony where these folks are given more notoriety.”[35]

Skoll Awards for Social Entrepreneurship awardees
Year Organization Awardee(s)
2005 Barefoot College Bunker Roy[36]
2005 CAMFED Ann Cotton[37]
2005 Fair Trade USA Paul Rice[38]
2005 Fundación Paraguaya Martin Burt[39]
2005 GoodWeave International Nina Smith[40]
2005 Institute for One World Health Victoria Hale[41]
2005 International Development Enterprises Amitabha Sadangi[42]
2005 KickStart International Nick Moon Martin Fisher[43]
2005 Sonidos de la Tierra Luis Szaran[44]
2006 Afghan Institute of Learning Sakena Yacoobi[45]
2006 Aflatoun Jeroo Billimoria[45]
2006 Benetech Jim Fruchterman[45]
2006 Ceres Mindy Lubber[45]
2006 Ciudad Saludable Albina Ruiz[45]
2006 Community and Individual Development Association City Campus Taddy Blecher[45]
2006 Health Care Without Harm Gary Cohen[45]
2006 Institute for Development Studies and Practices Quratulain Bakhteari [45]
2006 International Bridges to Justice Karen I. Tse[45]
2006 PeerForward formally, College Summit J.B. Schramm[45]
2006 Riders for Health [45]
2006 Room to Read John Wood[45]
2006 Roots of Peace Heidi Kuhn[45]
2006 Saude Crianca Vera Cordeiro[45]
2006 Search for Common Ground
[45]
2006 VillageReach Blaise Judja-Sato[45]
2007 Fundacion Escuela Nueva Vicky Colbert[46]
2007 Gram Vikas Joe Madiath[47]
2007 Kashf Foundation Roshaneh Zafar[48]
2007 Manchester Bidwell Corporation William Strickland[49]
2007 Marine Stewardship Council Rupert Howes[50]
2008 Amazon Conservation Team [51]
2008 American Council on Renewable Energy Michael Eckhart[52]
2008 Arzu Connie Duckworth[53]
2008 Digital Divide Data
  • Jeremy Hockenstein
  • Mai Siriphongphanh
[54]
2008 Kiva
[51]
2008 mothers2mothers
  • Gene Falk
  • Mitchell Besser
[55]
2008 OneSky Jenny Bowen[56]
2008 Voice of the Free,formerly Visayan Forum Foundation Maria Cecilia Flores-Oebanda[57]
2009 APOPO Bart Weetjens[58]
2009 Bioregional Development Group
  • Pooran Desai
  • Sue Riddlestone
[59]
2009 Gaia Amazonas Martin von Hildebrand [60]
2009 INJAZ Al-Arab Soraya Salti[61]
2009 International Center for Transitional Justice Juan E. Méndez, Paul van Zyl [62]
2009 Teach for All Wendy Kopp[63]
2009 Water.org Gary White[64]
2010 Building Markets Scott Gilmore[65]
2010 Encore.org Marc Freedman[66]
2010 Forest Trends Michael Jenkins[67]
2010 Imazon
  • Carlos Souza Jr
  • Beto Verissimo
[68]
2010 One Acre Fund Andrew Young[69]
2010 Telapak Ambrosuis Ruwindruarto, Silverius Oscar Unggul[70]
2010 Tostan Molly Melching[71]
2011 Health Leads Rebecca Onie[72]
2011 New Teacher Center Ellen Moir[73]
2011 Pratham Madhav Chavan[74]
2012 Landesa Tim Hanstad[22]
2012 Proximity Designs
  • Debbie Aung Din Taylor
  • Jim Taylor
[75]
2013 Independent Diplomat Carne Ross[76]
2014 Khan Academy Sal Khan[77][78]
2014 B Lab
  • Jay Coen Gilbert
  • Bart Houlahan
[79]
2014 Fundación Capital Yves Moury[80]
2014 Girls Not Brides Mabel van Oranje[81]
2014 Global Witness
[82]
2014 Medic Mobile Josh Nesbit[83]
2014 Slum Dwellers International Jockin Arputham[84]
2014 Water and Sanitation for the Urban Poor (WSUP) Sam Parker[85]
2015 Blue Ventures lasdair Harris[86]
2015 Educate Girls Foundation Safeena Husain[86]
2015 Foundation for Ecological Security Jagdeesh Rao Puppala[86]
2015 Institute of Public and Environmental Affairs Ma Jun (environmentalist)[86]
2016 Breakthrough
[87]
2016 Equal Justice Initiative Bryan Stevenson[88]
2016 Living Goods Chuck Slaughter[89]
2016 Namati Vivek Maru[90]
2016 Videre Oren Yakobovich[91]
2017 Babban Gona Kola Masha[92]
2017 Build Change Elizabeth Hausler[93]
2017 Last Mile Health Raj Panjabi[94]
2017 Polaris Project Bradley Myles[95]
2018 Code for America Jennifer Pahlka[96]
2018 Global Health Corps Barbara Bush[97]
2018 SELCO India Selco Foundation[98]
2019 Crisis Text Line Nancy Lublin[99]
2019 Harambee Youth Employment Accelerator [100]
2019 mPedigree
[100]
2019 mPharma Gregory Rockson [100]
2019 Thorn (organization) Julie Cordua[100]
2020 ARMMAN Aparna hedge[101]
2020 Centre for Tech and Civil Life
  • Tiana Epps-Johnson
  • Whitney May
  • Donny Bridges
[101]
2020 Glasswing International [101]
2020 Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project
  • Drew Sullivan
  • Paul Radu
[101]
2020 International Council on Clean Transportation Drew Kodjak[101]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]