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Singapore Artillery Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Singapore_Artillery

Singapore Artillery
Singapore Artillery logo.png
ActiveFebruary 1840 – present
Country Singapore
Branch Singapore Army
TypeArtillery
RoleIndirect fire
Target acquisition
Size4 battalions (2 regulars, 2 conscripts)
Part ofSingapore Armed Forces
Garrison/HQAmoy Quee Camp
Kranji Camp II
Khatib Camp
Nickname(s)"Men of Steel"
Motto(s)In Oriente Primus (Latin)
(English: "First in the East")
Commanders
Chief Artillery OfficerColonel Devieash James

The Singapore Artillery is a formation of the Singapore Army. It consists of two battalions made up of regular servicemen, one active conscript and one reservist battalions. The primary role of the Artillery is to deliver timely, accurate and effective fire in support of the manoeuvre force to accomplish its missions. As the Artillery is an indirect fire support system, the gunners at the weapons do not need to see the targets to engage fire.

The location of the targets are provided by the forward observers as well as elements of target acquisition unit. This information is then passed to the command post which commands and controls the weapons delivering the fire

Established in 1840 by the British Army, as Singapore Volunteer Artillery Corps. It is the oldest formation of the Singapore Army.

Their unofficial motto is "Once a gunner, always a gunner!".[1]

Units[edit]

Battalions

  • 20th Battalion Singapore Artillery (20 SA)
    • Amoy Quee Camp (no longer in service)
  • 21st Battalion Singapore Artillery (21 SA)
    • Motto: Deadly Accurate
    • Kranji Camp II
  • 23rd Battalion Singapore Artillery (23 SA)
    • Motto: Every Round Counts
    • Khatib Camp
  • 24th Battalion Singapore Artillery (24 SA)
    • Motto: Swift And Precise
    • Khatib Camp

Headquarters[edit]

  • Amoy Quee Camp - 20 SA
  • Kranji Camp II - 21 SA
  • Khatib Camp - HQ SA, AI, 23 SA, 24 SA

Equipment[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'PM Lee, my army buddy': What it was like doing NS with the man who became Prime Minister". Channelnewsasia.com. Archived from the original on 19 August 2018. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Live-firing of the Primus". Mindef.gov.sg. Archived from the original on 4 April 2005. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  3. ^ a b "The Singapore Army - Artillery - Equipment". Mindef.gov.sg. Archived from the original on 6 October 2007. Retrieved 26 August 2018.
  4. ^ "Commissioning of the Singapore Light Weight Howitzer Pegasus". Mindef.gov.sg. Archived from the original on 30 October 2005. Retrieved 26 August 2018.

External links[edit]