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Sadgop Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sadgop

The Sadgop sub-caste is a Bengali Hindu Yadav caste,[1] found in West Bengal, Odisha, Jharkhand and parts of Bihar state in India.[2] Traditionally they are engaged in dairy-farming and cultivation.[3][4] However, historically Sadgop kings had ruled some parts of Bengal such as Gopbhum, Karnagarh,[5] Narayangarh and Balarampur.[6] They are one of the fourteen castes belonging to 'Nabasakh' group.[7] They are recognized as a General caste.[8]

History and varna[edit]

Sadgops have generally been considered as clean shudras (sat-shudras) in the caste structure of Bengal.[9][10] Like south India social groups of east India usually divided in two grades - Brahmins and Shudras.[11] In the 1910s, Sadgops along with Ahirs, Gops, Gopals, and Goalas began claiming kshatriya status based on claimed descent from the legendary king Yadu. The Yadav-kshatriya movement attracted communities in the Gangetic plain who were associated with a combination of cultivation, cattle-herding, and dairy farming.[12] According to some, Sadgops believe they have descended from Lord Krishna.[13]

Present circumstances[edit]

The Sadgop consist of a number of sub-divisions. They are an endogamous group and practice gotra exogamy. The Sadgop are mainly a landholding community, but many Sadgop have settled in Kolkata and other cities of West Bengal. Their own community organization is named as Bangiya Sadgop Samiti.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Global Prayer Digest". Global Prayer Digest. 2020-04-24. Retrieved 2021-02-09.
  2. ^ a b People of India Bihar Volume XVI Part Two edited by S Gopal & Hetukar Jha pages 827 to 831 Seagull Books
  3. ^ Man in Biosphere: A Case Study of Similipal Biosphere Reserve. Anthropological Survey of India. 2013. ISBN 978-81-212-1163-5.
  4. ^ Suraj Bandyopadhyay; A R. Rao; Bikas Kumar Sinha (2011). Models for Social Networks With Statistical Applications. SAGE. pp. 24–. ISBN 978-1-4129-4168-6.
  5. ^ John R. McLane (25 July 2002). Land and Local Kingship in Eighteenth-Century Bengal. Cambridge University Press. pp. 157–. ISBN 978-0-521-52654-8.
  6. ^ Sekhar Bandyopadhyay (1 July 2004). Caste, Culture and Hegemony: Social Dominance in Colonial Bengal. SAGE Publications. pp. 51–. ISBN 978-81-321-0407-0.
  7. ^ Sanyal, Hitesranjan (1981). Social Mobility in Bengal. Papyrus. p. 115.
  8. ^ Pfeffer, Georg; Behera, Deepak Kumar (1997). Contemporary Society: Developmental issues, transition, and change. Concept Publishing Company. ISBN 978-81-7022-642-0.
  9. ^ Sanyal, Hitesranjan (1971). "Continuities of Social Mobility in Traditional and Modern Society in India: Two Case Studies of Caste Mobility in Bengal". The Journal of Asian Studies. 30 (2): 315–339. doi:10.2307/2942917. ISSN 1752-0401. JSTOR 2942917.
  10. ^ Mitra, A. (1953). The Tribes and Castes of West Bengal (Report). Census 1951. Land and Land Revenue Department, Government of West Bengal. p. 21.
  11. ^ SIRCAR, D. C. (1959). STUDIES IN THE SOCIETY AND ADMINISTRATION OF ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL INDIA VOL. 1. FIRMA K. L. MUKHOPADHYAY, CALCUTTA. p. 115.
  12. ^ William R. Pinch (18 June 1996). Peasants and Monks in British India. University of California Press. p. 91. ISBN 978-0-520-91630-2. Retrieved 9 July 2017.
  13. ^ Man in Biosphere: A Case Study of Similipal Biosphere Reserve. Anthropological Survey of India. 2013. ISBN 978-81-212-1163-5.