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List of hoaxes Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_hoaxes

The following is a list of hoaxes:

Proven hoaxes[edit]

These are some claims that have been revealed or proven definitively to be deliberate public hoaxes. This list does not include hoax articles published on or around April 1, a long list of which can be found in the "List of April Fools' Day jokes" article.

A–F[edit]

G–M[edit]

N–S[edit]

T–Z[edit]

Proven hoaxes of exposure[edit]

"Proven hoaxes of exposure" are semi-comical or private sting operations.[citation needed] They usually encourage people to act foolishly or credulously by falling for patent nonsense that the hoaxer deliberately presents as reality. See also culture jamming.

Journalistic hoaxes[edit]

Deliberate hoaxes, or journalistic fraud, that drew widespread attention include:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Plimpton, George (2004). The Curious Case of Sidd Finch. New York, NY: Four Walls Eight Windows. ISBN 1-56858-296-X.
  2. ^ Mikkelson, Barbara & David P. "Hunting For Bambi" at Snopes.com: Urban Legends Reference Pages.
  3. ^ Victor, Daniel (September 30, 2022). "For Once, the Hurricane Shark Was Real". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 30, 2022. Retrieved September 30, 2022.
  4. ^ Mehta, Ankita (2014-08-28). "'Two Moons' Hoax: Absence of Twin Moon on 27 August Disappoints Many". International Business Times. Retrieved 2014-08-31.
  5. ^ Heyd, Theresa (2008). Email Hoaxes: Form, Function, Genre Ecology. Amsterdam: John Benjamins Publishing Company. p. 4. ISBN 978-90-272-5418-4. Retrieved October 30, 2010.
  6. ^ Stein, Gordon (1993). Encyclopedia of hoaxes. Internet Archive. Detroit : Gale Research. p. 279. ISBN 978-0-8103-8414-9.
  7. ^ Case, Richard A. (July 2, 1976). "Rubbing uncovers truth". Syracuse Herald-Journal.
  8. ^ Brown, Dan (2003). The Da Vinci Code. Doubleday. ISBN 0-385-50420-9.
  9. ^ Cohn, Norman (1966). Warrant for Genocide: The Myth of the Jewish World-Conspiracy and the Protocols of the Elder of Zion. New York: Harper & Row..
  10. ^ Sarah Dai (2018-08-17). "Redcore CEO admits '100pc China-developed browser' is built on Google's Chrome, says writing code from scratch would 'take many years'". South China Morning Post. Archived from the original on 2018-08-17. Retrieved 2018-08-17.
  11. ^ "Maccas in damage control over Seriously McDonald's picture hoax". News.com.au. 14 June 2011. Retrieved 18 June 2011.
  12. ^ Rogers, A. Glenn (1953). "The Taughannock Giant". No. Fall 2003. Life in the Finger Lakes. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  13. ^ Githler, Charley (26 December 2017). "A Look Back At: Home-Grown Hoax: The Taughannock Giant". Tompkins Weekly. Retrieved 28 June 2019.
  14. ^ "Saturn and Lord Shaneeshwara – Part One | Mysteries Explored". Archived from the original on 2015-12-23. Retrieved 2015-12-23.
  15. ^ "The depressing tale of Johann Hari". The Economist. September 15, 2011.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]