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Health in the Central African Republic Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Health_in_the_Central_African_Republic

Mothers and babies aged between 0 and 5 years lining up in a health post in 2008 at Begoua, a district of Bangui, waiting for the two drops of the oral polio vaccine that will prevent paralysis and death. Despite the progress over the past few years, medical care remains both costly and inaccessible for many families across the Central African Republic. Vaccination coverage for preventable diseases stands at less than 52% and one child in eight does not live past five years of age.[1]

Health in the Central African Republic has been degraded by years of internal conflict and economic turmoil since independence from France in 1960. One sixth of its population is in need of acute medical care. Endemic diseases also put a hide demand on the health infrastructure, which requires outside assistance to sustain itself.[2][3]

The Human Rights Measurement Initiative[4] finds that the Central African Republic is fulfilling 65.7% of what it should be fulfilling for the right to health based on its level of income.[5] When looking at the right to health with respect to children, the Central African Republic achieves 92.1% of what is expected based on its current income.[6] In regards to the right to health amongst the adult population, the country achieves only 75.2% of what is expected based on the nation's level of income. [7] The Central African Republic falls into the "very bad" category when evaluating the right to reproductive health because the nation is fulfilling only 29.8% of what the nation is expected to achieve based on the resources (income) it has available.[8]


Health infrastructure[edit]

Two bush ambulances in Kaga-Bandoro that have been stripped and looted by local militias.

The largest hospitals in the country are located in the Bangui district. As a member of the World Health Organization, the Central African Republic receives vaccination assistance, such as a 2014 intervention for the prevention of a measles epidemic.[9] In 2007, female life expectancy at birth was 48.2 years and male life expectancy at birth was 45.1 years.[10]

The following notable hospitals are located in the Central African Republic. The city and prefectures are listed with the name of the hospital.[11][2]

Health status[edit]

Life expectancy[edit]

The 2014 CIA estimated average life expectancy in the Central African Republic was 51.81 years.[3]

Endemic diseases[edit]

Malaria is one of the leading causes of death.[15] According to 2009 estimates, the HIV/AIDS prevalence rate is about 4.7% of the adult population (ages 15–49).[16] This is in general agreement with the 2016 United Nations estimate of approximately 4%.[17] Government expenditure on health was US$20 (PPP) per person in 2006[10] and 10.9% of total government expenditure in 2006.[10] There was only around 1 physician for every 20,000 persons in 2009.[18]

Maternal and child healthcare[edit]

Women's health is poor in the Central African Republic. As of 2010, the country had the 4th highest maternal mortality rate in the world.[19] The total fertility rate in 2014 was estimated at 4.46 children born/woman.[19] Approximately 25% of women had undergone female genital mutilation.[20] Many births in the country are guided by traditional birth attendants, who often have little or no formal training.[21]

The 2010 maternal mortality rate per 100,000 births for Central African Republic is 850. This is compared with 1570.4 in 2008 and 1757.1 in 1990. The under 5 mortality rate, per 1,000 births is 172 and the neonatal mortality as a percentage of under 5's mortality is 26. In the Central African Republic the number of midwives per 1,000 live births is 3 and the lifetime risk of death for pregnant women 1 in 27.[22]

HIV/AIDS[edit]

There were 13,000 deaths from HIV/AIDS in 2007.[23] and 11,000 in 2009.[24] 160,000 people with HIV/AIDS were reported in 2007, and 140,000 in 2009, for a prevalence rate of about 3.2%.[25] By 2016, the prevalence rate had dropped to about 2.8%, although the prevalence in gay males was over 25%.[26]

Coronavirus[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Child and Infant Mortality". Our World In Data. Retrieved 13 January 2021.
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x Elahi, Ebby, ed. (2021). Insights in Global Health, A Compendium of Healthcare Facilities and Nonprofit Organizations. Baca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. ISBN 9780367693466.
  3. ^ a b "The World Factbook, Central African Republic". Central Intelligence Agency. Archived from the original on 2018-12-29. Retrieved 2015-11-29.
  4. ^ "Human Rights Measurement Initiative – The first global initiative to track the human rights performance of countries". humanrightsmeasurement.org. Retrieved 2022-03-15.
  5. ^ "Central African Republic - HRMI Rights Tracker". rightstracker.org. Retrieved 2022-03-15.
  6. ^ "Central African Republic - HRMI Rights Tracker". rightstracker.org. Retrieved 2022-03-15.
  7. ^ "Central African Republic - HRMI Rights Tracker". rightstracker.org. Retrieved 2022-03-15.
  8. ^ "Central African Republic - HRMI Rights Tracker". rightstracker.org. Retrieved 2022-03-15.
  9. ^ "WHO – Health in Central African Republic". Archived from the original on 13 October 2014. Retrieved 16 October 2014.
  10. ^ a b c "Human Development Report 2009 – Central African Republic". Hdrstats.undp.org. Archived from the original on 5 September 2010. Retrieved 27 June 2010.
  11. ^ Entries in Google Maps database
  12. ^ "Barriers accessing healthcare in Ouaka, Central African Republic". Doctors without Borders. December 24, 2020. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  13. ^ "Bria Hospital". Doctors 4 Africa. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  14. ^ "Central African Republic: Fighting spreads like infection". BBC. July 25, 2014. Retrieved January 8, 2021.
  15. ^ "Malaria – one of the leading causes of death in the Central African Republic". Archived from the original on 4 November 2014. Retrieved 16 October 2014.
  16. ^ CIA World Factbook: HIV/AIDS – adult prevalence rate Archived 21 December 2014 at the Wayback Machine. Cia.gov. Retrieved 6 April 2013.
  17. ^ "Central African Republic". Unaids.org. 29 July 2016. Archived from the original on 1 July 2018. Retrieved 30 June 2018.
  18. ^ "WHO Country Offices in the WHO African Region – WHO | Regional Office for Africa". Afro.who.int. Archived from the original on 1 February 2014. Retrieved 27 June 2010.
  19. ^ a b "Country Comparison :: Maternal mortality rate". The World Factbook. Archived from the original on 18 April 2015. Retrieved 16 October 2014.
  20. ^ "WHO – Female genital mutilation and other harmful practices". Archived from the original on 12 October 2014. Retrieved 16 October 2014.
  21. ^ "Mother and child health in Central African Republic". Archived from the original on 20 October 2014. Retrieved 16 October 2014.
  22. ^ "The State Of The World's Midwifery". United Nations Population Fund. Retrieved August 1, 2011.
  23. ^ "Central African Republic (CAR)". Archived from the original on 2012-02-29.
  24. ^ "Global HIV Resources". hivinsite.ucsf.edu.
  25. ^ "Statistics". UNICEF. Retrieved January 7, 2021.
  26. ^ "Central African Republic". United Nations Aids. Retrieved January 7, 2021.

External links[edit]