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Commercial Affairs Department Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Commercial_Affairs_Department

Commercial Affairs Department
AbbreviationCAD
Jurisdictional structure
National agencySingapore
Operations jurisdictionSingapore
Governing bodyGovernment of Singapore
General nature
Operational structure
Elected officers responsible
  • Teo Chee Hean, Senior Minister & Coordinating Minister for National Security
  • K Shanmugam, Minister for Home Affairs & Minister for Law
  • Josephine Teo, Minister for Communications and Information & Second Minister for Home Affairs
  • Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim, Minister of State for Home Affairs & Minister of State for National Development
  • Desmond Tan, Minister of State for Home Affairs & Minister of State for Sustainability and the Environment
Parent agencyMinistry of Home Affairs

Coordinates: 1°16′42.29″N 103°50′21.57″E / 1.2784139°N 103.8393250°E / 1.2784139; 103.8393250 The Commercial Affairs Department (CAD) is a staff department of the Singapore Police Force (SPF). The department was first established in 1984 as the Commercial Crime Department (CCD), it is the white-collar crimes unit[1] of the SPF.

History[edit]

The department was first established in 1984 as the Commercial Crime Department (CCD) with Glenn Knight as its first director.

Modern day[edit]

Background[edit]

As the white-collar crimes unit[2] of the police force, CAD conducts a variety of inquiries ranging from corporate irregularities such as LionGold[3] and Data Register[4] in 2014, as well as casino-related offences.[5] It also has the right making arrests.[6]

Probes[edit]

High-profile probes conducted by CAD include City Harvest Church[7] founder Kong Hee,[8] former bank relationship manager Vyia Lee Yock Sim who had misappropriated more than US$400,000 from seven high net-worth clients by 2006,[9] China tourist guide Yang Yin with a widow's niece over a legal tussle assets believed to be worth $40 million.[10]

In September 2003, the CAD is also responsible for the capture of Chia Teck Leng, who was found to have misused his position as the finance manager of Asia Pacific Breweries to swindle over $117 million from four foreign banks to pay off his debts and feed his gambling addiction. Chia is currently serving a 42-year jail term since 2004 for the crime, which was then the worst commercial crime Singapore has ever witnessed.[11]

In January 2000, the CAD acted upon a report to arrest SIA cabin crew supervisor Teo Cheng Kiat for embezzling an approximate sum of $35 million from his company. Teo was charged with 26 counts of criminal breach of trust and corruption, and he was sentenced to 24 years in jail after the courts convicted him of ten out of these charges.[12][13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kwok, Jonathan. "Police investigating trading irregularities after penny stock meltdown". Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  2. ^ Kwok, Jonathan. "Police investigating trading irregularities after penny stock meltdown". Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  3. ^ "Remaining potential investors in LionGold withdraw following CAD probe". 24 Jun 2014. Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  4. ^ Hoe, Pei Shan (18 Jun 2014). "Data Register being investigated by police, monies from bank account seized". Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  5. ^ Ng, Kai Ling. "RWS fined $600000 for partially reimbursing levies for 3400 patrons". Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  6. ^ "statement by singapore police force" (PDF). POLICE NEWS RELEASE.
  7. ^ "CAD charges are against individuals, not the church: DPM Teo". Singapore Press Holdings Ltd. 26 Jun 2012. Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  8. ^ Kok, Xing Hui (12 September 2014). "Kong's CAD statements 'at odds with confession letter'". Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  9. ^ Lim (28 Jun 2014). "Crime busters win accolades for cracking cases". Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  10. ^ Khew, Carolyn. "Former China tour guide Yang Yin called back to assist police with investigations". Retrieved 13 January 2015.
  11. ^ "Guilty As Charged: Chia Teck Leng led a double life and cheated banks of millions". The Straits Times. 16 May 2016. Retrieved 5 December 2021.
  12. ^ "Public Prosecutor v Teo Cheng Kiat" (PDF). Singapore Law Watch. 6 July 2000. Retrieved 27 January 2022.
  13. ^ "Greed, greed and more greed". The Straits Times. 1 July 2000.

External links[edit]