mic_none

Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Award Source: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_I._duPont-Columbia_University_Award

Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Award
Awarded forThe best in television, radio, and digital journalism
LocationNew York City
Country United States
Presented byColumbia University Graduate School of Journalism
WebsiteduPont-Columbia Awards

The Alfred I. duPont–Columbia University Award honors excellence in broadcast and digital journalism in the public service and is considered one of the most prestigious awards in journalism. The awards were established in 1942 and administered until 1967 by Washington and Lee University's O. W. Riegel, Curator and Head of the Department of Journalism and Communications.[1] Since 1968 they have been administered by the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism in New York City, and are considered by some to be the broadcast equivalent of the Pulitzer Prize, another program administered by Columbia University.[2]

Dedicated to upholding the highest journalism standards, the duPont awards inform the public about the contributions news organizations and journalists make to their communities, support journalism education and innovation, and cultivate a collective spirit for the profession.

The duPont-Columbia Awards were established by Jessie Ball duPont in memory of her husband Alfred I. du Pont. It is the most well-respected journalism-only award for broadcast journalism; starting in 2009, it began accepting digital submissions. The duPont, along with the George Foster Peabody Awards, rank among the most prestigious awards programs in all electronic media.

The duPont-Columbia jury selects the winners from programs that air in the United States between July 1 and June 30 of each year. Award winners receive batons in gold and silver designed by the American architect Louis I. Kahn. The gold baton, when awarded, is given exclusively in honor of truly outstanding broadcast journalism.

Notable winners[edit]

In 2003, the first-ever foreign-language program was awarded a duPont-Columbia Award: CNN en Español and reporter Jorge Gestoso won a Silver Baton for investigative reporting on Argentina's desaparecidos.

In 2010, the first award for digital reporting was given to MediaStorm and photographer Jonathan Torgovnik for "Intended Consequences" about children born of rape in Rwanda.

In 2012, the first-ever theatrically released documentary film was honored by the duPont jury: the Oscar-nominated Hell and Back Again, about the war in Afghanistan and the struggles facing veterans when they return home.

Note[edit]

All winners are listed on the website of the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.[3]

duPont Award[edit]

1942[edit]

1943[edit]

1944[edit]

1945[edit]

1946[edit]

1947[edit]

1948[edit]

1949[edit]

1950[edit]

1951[edit]

1952[edit]

1953[edit]

1954[edit]

1955[edit]

1956[edit]

1957[edit]

1958[edit]

1959[edit]

1960[edit]

1961[edit]

1962[edit]

1963[edit]

1964[edit]

1965[edit]

duPont–Columbia Award[edit]

1969[edit]

1971[edit]

1972[edit]

1973[edit]

1974[edit]

1975[edit]

1976[edit]

1978[edit]

1979[edit]

1980[edit]

1981[edit]

1982[edit]

1984[edit]

  • SILVER BATON CBS News, "60 Minutes: Good Cop, Bad Cop; Honor Thy Children; and Go Park It in Tokyo"
  • SILVER BATON John Camp and WBRZ, Baton Rouge, Louisiana, For investigative reporting
  • SILVER BATON KCTS-TV, Seattle, Washington and Face to Face Productions, "Rape: Face to Face"
  • SILVER BATON KRON-TV, San Francisco, California, "The War Within"
  • SILVER BATON National Public Radio, "The Most Dangerous Game: Nuclear Face-off in Europe"
  • SILVER BATON NBC News, "News Overnight"
  • SILVER BATON Richard Threlkeld, Status Reports on "ABC World News Tonight"
  • SILVER BATON SPECIAL INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION AWARD: Jon Alpert and NBC News, "American Survival" (aired on Today[8])
  • SILVER BATON Terry Drinkwater, Cancer Reports on "CBS Evening News"
  • SILVER BATON WBBM-TV, Chicago, Illinois, "Killing Crime: A Police Cop-Out"
  • SILVER BATON WMAQ-TV, Chicago, Illinois, "Unit 5: The Chicago Police Investigations"
  • SILVER BATON WSMV-TV, Nashville, Tennessee, "Innocent Shame: The Legacy of Child Sexual Abuse"
  • SILVER BATON WTCN-TV, Minneapolis, Minnesota, "Herpes is Forever"

1985[edit]

  • SILVER BATON ABC News, "Nightline"
  • SILVER BATON ABC News, "World News Tonight: US-USSR: A Balance of Powers"
  • SILVER BATON Brian Ross and Ira Silverman, Outstanding investigative reporting on NBC News
  • SILVER BATON CBS News, "60 Minutes: Lenell Geter's in Jail"
  • SILVER BATON KOSU Radio, Stillwater, Oklahoma, "Selling the Public Spectrum"
  • SILVER BATON KRON-TV, San Francisco, California, "Climate of Death"
  • SPECIAL INDEPENDENT PRODUCTION AWARD: Medvideo, Ltd. and Group W, "Whispering Hope: Unmasking the Mystery of Alzheimer's"
  • Special Independent Production Award: Quest Productions and PBS, "The First Fifty Years: Reflections on US-Soviet Relations"
  • SILVER BATON Suburban Cablevision, Avenel, New Jersey, "Right to Know: Hillside: A Desegregation Story"
  • SILVER BATON The Documentary Consortium and PBS "Frontline: Mind of a Murderer"
  • SILVER BATON WGBH-TV and PBS, Boston, Massachusetts, "Vietnam: A Television History"
  • SILVER BATON WJXT-TV, Jacksonville, Florida, "The Smell of Money"
  • SILVER BATON WJZ-TV, Baltimore, Maryland, "Baby Boom: The Pig in the Python"

1986[edit]

1987[edit]

1988[edit]

  • GOLD BATON Blackside, Inc., Eyes on the Prize: America's Civil Rights Years, 1954-1965
  • SILVER BATON ABC News, "20/20: By His Father's Hand: The Zumwalkts"
  • SILVER BATON CBS News, "48 Hours on Crack Street"
  • SILVER BATON Florence Films, "Huey Long"
  • SILVER BATON KMOV-TV, St. Louis, Missouri, "Sauget: City of Shame"
  • SILVER BATON NBC News, Robert Bazell, For Coverage of the AIDS epidemic
  • SILVER BATON Pam Zekman and WBBM-TV, Chicago, Illinois, For Investigative Reporting
  • SILVER BATON Roberta Baskin and WJLA-TV, Washington, D.C. For Investigative Reporting
  • SILVER BATON WCCO-TV, Minneapolis, Minnesota, For the I-Team
  • SILVER BATON WFAA-TV, Dallas, Texas, SMU Investigation
  • SILVER BATON WJXT-TV, Jacksonville, Florida, Jacksonville, Florida, "Jacksonville's Roads: The Deadly Drive Home"
  • SILVER BATON WLAP Radio, Lexington, Kentucky, "Passing On the Secret of Sexual Abuse"
  • SILVER BATON WPLG-TV, Miami, Florida, "Florida: State of Neglect"

1989[edit]

1990[edit]

1991[edit]

1992[edit]

1993[edit]

1994[edit]

1995[edit]

1996[edit]

1997[edit]

1998[edit]

1999[edit]

2000[edit]

2001[edit]

2002[edit]

2003[edit]

2004[edit]

2005[edit]

The duPont Jury also announced four finalists for their exemplary broadcast journalism:

2006[edit]

2007[edit]

2008[edit]

The thirteen awards for 2008 were announced on December 17, 2007, and presented on January 16, 2008.[16]

2009[edit]

Television: Golden Baton Winner

  • WFAA-TV in Dallas for "Money for Nothing", "A Passing Offense", "The Buried and the Dead" (Byron Harris, Brett Shipp, reporters)

Television & Radio, Silver Baton Winners

2010[edit]

Television, Radio, and Web: Silver Baton Winners

2011[edit]

Television, Radio, and Digital: Silver Baton Winners

2012[edit]

2013[edit]

Source:[17]

2014[edit]

2015[edit]

2016[edit]

2017[edit]

2018[edit]

2019[edit]

2020[edit]

2021[edit]

2022[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The Nemours Papers: Series 3 of the duPont family papers, Special Collections, Washington and Lee University Special Collections and Archives, James G. Leyburn Library. Box-folder 26:44 R5 Alfred I. duPont Radio Awards
  2. ^ "Columbia University Announces 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Broadcast News Award Winners". Columbia News (Press release). Columbia University. June 5, 2007 [January 13, 2007]. Retrieved 24 July 2019.
  3. ^ All duPont–Columbia Award Winners Archived August 14, 2012, at the Wayback Machine, Columbia Journalism School. Retrieved 2014-12-18.
  4. ^ Pauline Frederick Papers, 1917–1990, Sophia Smith Collection, Smith College. Retrieved 2013-08-05.
  5. ^ O'Connor, John J. (1977-06-14). "TV: NBC Looks at Human Rights (Published 1977)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-01-02.
  6. ^ Buckley, Tom (1978-08-03). "TV: 'Arson: Fire for Hire' (Published 1978)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-01-01.
  7. ^ "Television (Published 1979)". The New York Times. 1979-01-16. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-01-01.
  8. ^ "LEANER TIMES FOR DOCUMENTARIANS (Published 1984)". The New York Times. 1984-06-10. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-01-02.
  9. ^ Belkin, Lisa (1987-02-05). "MOYERS WINS A TOP PRIZE IN BROADCAST JOURNALISM (Published 1987)". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-01-02.
  10. ^ "Columbia University School of Journalism Honors NPR". AP NEWS. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  11. ^ "Fred Friendly Honored In Broadcasting Awards (Published 1994)". The New York Times. 1994-01-28. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  12. ^ a b "Daniel Schorr Wins Gold Baton at 54th duPont-Columbia Awards". Retrieved 2020-12-25.
  13. ^ "CBS News. Richard Schlesinger. Correspondent, 48 Hours Mystery". Archived from the original on 12 July 2011. Retrieved 2011-06-09.
  14. ^ "CRY FREETOWN" (Interview). PBS NewsHour. 25 January 2001. Retrieved 14 October 2011.
  15. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2010-06-07. Retrieved 2010-05-27.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  16. ^ Columbia News: December 17, 2007-
  17. ^ "2013 WINNERS: 14 SILVER BATONS". Columbia Journalism School. Archived from the original on 25 December 2012. Retrieved 3 January 2013.

External links[edit]